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Can You Say ? (You Can See) :

'Poetry Plastique'

Marianne Boesky 535 West 22nd Street, Chelsea Through March 10

"Art and poetry: made for each other. So it has always been. Poets write about art; artists turn to poetry for ideas. Sometimes the two disciplines meet in collaboration; occasionally that collaboration is forged in the work of a single person. All these variables are aired in "Poetry Plastique," in which image and word are flexibly intertwined.

Organized by Jay Sanders, who is on the staff at Boesky, and the poet Charles Bernstein, the selection covers a stretch of recent historical ground. At the early end are scribbly, word-peppered Blakean pages by Robert Smithson from 1962 and a labyrinthine written piece by the arch-Fluxian Jackson Mac Low from 1975. The 1970's are well represented here, with work by Carl Andre, Wallace Berman and text- and-image collaborations by Arakawa and Madeline Gins.

Other work is new. Mr. Bernstein collaborates with Richard Tuttle on a witty sculpture made of plump, strung together 3-D letters, and with Susan Bee on a noirish painting in which Emily Dickinson and Mickey Spillane face off. Dickinson's attenuated handwriting finds an echo in Mira Schor's word paintings. The show enters the digital realm in a rich text-and-image work by Johanna Drucker and Brad Freeman, and in Tan Lin's computer-generated poetry pulsing away on three monitors.

The day after the show opened, the gallery was host to a series of related panel discussions and readings. Poets and artists participated. A big audience turned up. It was great. The buzz of voices and ideas made the art in the room — and Chelsea itself, for that matter — feel alive and interactive. Some of the pieces really need that charge; they look staid and hermetic without it. But others do fine on their own, and the cross-disciplinary concept behind the show is ripe for further exploration.

Perhaps Mr. Sanders and Mr. Bernstein already have further plans along these lines. Meanwhile, art and texts mutually ignite elsewhere in the city these days: in Cy Twombly's not-to-be-missed "Coronation of Sesostris" paintings, based on a poem by Patricia Waters, at Gagosian Gallery (980 Madison Avenue, at 76th Street, through tomorrow); in a collaboration between the painter Max Gimblett and the poet John Yau at Ethan Cohen Fine Art (37 Walker Street, SoHo, through March 10); in a series of collaborative prints by contemporary Puerto Rican artists and poets at El Taller Boricua (Lexington Avenue at 106th Street, through tomorrow); in an exhibition of contemporary text-based works, "A Way with Words," at the Whitney at Philip Morris (120 Park Avenue, at 42nd Street, through March 30); and in a jewel of an exhibition of artists' diaries, with bold little drawings and sonnet-size personal jottings, at the Archives of American Art (1285 Avenue of the Americas, at 51st Street, through May 31)."

- HOLLAND COTTER for NYT


- bill 2-23-2001 6:06 pm [link] [5 refs] [3 comments]

Art expert Rudolph Giuliani clamping down on free speach, again !


- bill 2-16-2001 5:39 pm [link] [3 comments]

'Avante-Garde', 'Schmavant-Garde'

`Avant-Garde' Artists Come in From the Cold (War) By STEPHEN KINZER ELLESLEY, Mass. (For NYT) —

"Although the 1950's are often described as somnolent years in the United States, they were also a time of artistic ferment, when dissonant music and abstract painting burst into the public consciousness.

But in recent years some scholars and curators have come to believe that this ferment was not really so radical, and that although these artists considered themselves consummate outsiders, their work often served to promote rather than subvert mainstream values.

The case is made at the Davis Museum and Cultural Center at Wellesley College here in an exhibition called "Cold War Modern: The Domesticated Avant-Garde." The show, which runs through June 17, links artistic innovators not to a tiny adventurous audience but to the mass culture of the times."


- bill 2-14-2001 3:24 pm [link] [1 ref] [2 comments]

Jan Dibbets, 'Early Works' @ Gladstone 515 w 24th, through 2/14 by Roberta Smith for NYT

"In the late 1960's and early 70's, Post-Minimalist and Conceptual artists of all stripes picked up the camera to record earthworks, performances and temporary installations. But few used it with the strict yet subtly witty formalist intent of Jan Dibbets, a prominent Dutch artist who is 60 and has been showing in New York since 1969."


- bill 2-09-2001 2:51 pm [link] [add a comment]

Genesis P-Orridge, instigator of "industrial music" and a true techno-pagan avatar, has a visual art show opening this Saturday, February 10, at Team Gallery.
Be there, or be oblong.
- alex 2-05-2001 3:25 pm [link] [1 ref] [1 comment]

"At Donald Judd's dusty mecca of Minimalism in Texas, a neon colossus by Dan Flavin"
- Kimmelman for NYT


- bill 2-05-2001 3:06 pm [link] [add a comment]