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For those attempting to trace the evolution of the txt dialect:

In 1962, abbreviations such as "tx" (thanks), "txt" (text) "pls" (please) and other highly common abbreviations that we all know and love from our mobiles were being used by my mother, working as a Telex operator. (For those who [dare I suppose it?] don't know, Telex operated via the telephone lines, and was similar to a telegram but business-to-business. Punchcard-era technology, although it had similarities to modern IRC and other chats.) I think we can safely say that ten to fifteen years is a slightly conservative estimate for the evolution of this particular dialect. (And as for the comments about grammarians espousing 'correct' or 'proper' usage - I don't want to start an involved debate here, because it's been done to death elsewhere, but most modern, practising grammarians will tell you that, for you, 'correct' or 'proper' English is the English you speak. "Yours Faithfully, Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells" is not a grammarian, he is merely a pedant, although the two are easily confused.) -HW


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Justin Space Obscene Interiors : hardcore amateur decore


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shipping container architecture



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Gordon Matta-Clark

documentations

at the gugg

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GLAMANAFESTO

GLAM appropriates from the oppressor.

(1) GLAM is constructed of ideas, objects, and styles which come from pop culture. (2) Being GLAM is possible because individuals have the power to choose multiple styles and personae for themselves from the repertoire of stereotypes our culture has created. (3) We are all unable to divest ourselves completely of these preconstructed identities. (4) Instead of swallowing them whole, we can use the power of individual choice to construct as many selves as will be useful to us in our sojourn through the media saturated world. Rather than allowing the Pop Culture machine to define us by defining these possibilities, we can seize signifiers from the aformentioned Machine and use them as powerfully charged elements in the construction of the selves we show to the world."
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particles



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Theory Trading Cards



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The next ENTERprise Architecture 03 / 09 -12



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Architecture and Theosophy Architronic the electronic journal of architecture



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ARK - 4 - 2003



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don west wax packs


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Nasher's Piano big D


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knocking off the knockoffs


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jeash another Annie Leibovitz Vanity Fair cover/ see David Bowie's Top 100 picks from his vinyl collection / new Diane Arbus discoveries, the colapse of PHILLIPS auction house and a killer piece titled Judging Andy . "As the value of Andy Warhol's work skyrocketed, the Warhol authentication board got increasingly powerful. And its apparently arbitrary decisions are infurating dealers and collectors, whose documented Warhols - some certified by the estate, others signed by the artist - have received a fatal "Not by Andy" verdict. Michael Shnayerson reports on the controversy."


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The Fusion Thing Landscape + Architecture
by GAVIN KEENEY for CounterPunch

"Outside of this cyclic, accidental, and discontinuous emergence of sublimated aspects of architecture's implicit ground, a third order of symbolization and abstraction is to be found that represents a preliminary and provisional synthesis of subject/object relations -- i.e., most often a figurative symbiosis built into form and described as gestural or sublime fusion of 'form' and 'content' in sculpture and the hybridized field of land art, most especially, where discursive orders are stripped away and an elemental, generative, and formal essence presses forward. In the case of art, and its near-automatic assumption of conceptual autonomy, the works of Noguchi and Smithson, plus the avalanche of land art-inspired landscape architecture after the 1960s, re-present the archaic and liminal nature of almost-first nature (perhaps 'fourth nature') through hyper-sensual manipulations of form and a presentiment, if not an acclamation, of pre-linguistic forms and seminal structural operations versus aspects of full-blown discourse (full-fledged signifiers). Here, timeliness is reduced to an iconic presence tipping inexorably toward absence (timelessness). These liminal measures most often take the form of excavations or insertions (interventions) that at the least pretend to re-write the codes of occupying or mapping presence. This type of deep-sea diving comes in many forms and is not limited to the delineation of art-in-the-landscape, or art-as-landscape. The concise, inward-driven nature of such expression is primarily poetic and is found in all of the arts. This archaistic jouissance deliberately invokes the ontological ground as a place 'before' -- pre-existent to -- the emergence of the Imaginary (the phantasmatic world of doubled and/or tripled un-realities). These figures play in the dust of the Self, seemingly before the emergence of the Ego (and Super Ego). Such fictive gestures also act as analogs for the extreme interiority of works of art and architecture prior to their deployment as cultural signs and tropes (figures of speech and thought). In the process of stripping away the detritus of signifying chains (modes of expression and discourse), such maneuvers circle the same ground repeatedly. The eventual collapse of the operative figures of near-speech simply occurs as the work vanishes into the annals of art or architectural history. The dissolution of many of Heizer's and Smithson's remote works matters hardly at all given that they were putative gestures at/within 'wilderness' but overt acts of defiance aimed at the production of art and the art world."


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butterpaper


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two languages

geometrical fundamentalism

(blowhard critiques)

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HDM Architecture As Conceptual Art? Fall 2003 / Winter 2004, Number 19


"The question here is not whether architecture is “legitimate” as an art form or is concerned with the ideation of form, but specifically how it operates or defines itself. When architecture is presented not as building technology, social development, or economic production, but rather as art, it operates in a different role—neither as building nor its representation but rather as a specific kind of cultural commodity. As such, it asks to be redefined in relation to its sister objects. If, for instance, architecture sees itself as a conceptual activity, the label is affiliated with a host of other conceptual art practices that have been legitimated elsewhere in the art world. Making this connection depends on a (usually formal) resemblance to these other objects. Conceptual architecture then participates—or at least attempts to align itself—within a cultural ecosystem that defines its participants and its objects as possessing a privileging aura. If, as art historian and Getty Research Institute director Thomas Crow caustically observed, the artistic avant-garde acts as the “research and development” arm of the culture industry, then architecture in this sense certainly belongs to the arts."



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architectural review
Disappearing Act

Daniel Libeskind’s plan for ground zero was the people’s choice, but the architect has been virtually neutralized by commercial forces.


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50 new architectural terms for the 21st century


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europe_by_ net



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Rosalind Krauss


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the urban center



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eisenman on terragni

AR interview

"First, let me go back to something Rosalind Krauss [art critic and theorist] said. She said that the animating device in the 1970s was the photograph—the photograph was a record of an event. In this sense it was an index, which was an attempt to modify the iconic value of the object. What is the problem with an icon? The object-as-icon is based on the metaphysics of presence [a belief in a unifying force behind truth and knowledge], as opposed to pure presence. So, my own work in architecture attempts to produce a series of photographic plates or indices in the sense that Krauss was talking about: I have taken existing maps and superposed them to reduce their iconic, historical, and pictorial value. But the Santiago project is slightly different: It is no longer merely an index of these superpositions. For example, in Santiago, my idea was to superpose a Cartesian grid onto the existing, organic, medieval “grid,” and warp or deform them with a topological grid that projects upward. This produces lines of force that were never a part of projective geometry. They mutate in the third dimension. This has a powerful impact on the ground surface. It is a way of dealing with the ground not as a single datum, not as a foundation, not as something stable. It disrupts its iconic value, turning it into an index."


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