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In spite of all that has been written about him, Eggleston remains an elusive figure, whose reticent manner has given rise to misunderstanding about his origin as a photographer. The story is often repeated that Eggleston’s career began suddenly one day in 1967, when he appeared at The Museum of Modern Art with a suitcase full of his Kodachrome slides for Chief Curator of Photography John Szarkowski. Although that meeting did take place, during which a professional relationship was established, it has been endowed with a mythic quality that distracts from the most significant factors involved in Eggleston’s emergence. First, he was aided by the critical acceptance of Pop Art in the 1960s and the movement’s preoccupation with everyday objects as the materials of fine art. Second, his strategy of appropriating the dye transfer process, an expensive and highly archival printing method normally used for high-end advertising images of consumer goods, places him within the dominant mode of conceptual art practice in the 1970s. Third, he spent nine years cultivating a relationship with Szarkowski, working with him to edit a large number of photographs to create a portfolio that would become the basis for his solo exhibition. Szarkowski’s curatorial backing was crucial in overcoming the critics’ skepticism of color photography.

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10087



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paris by gaslight


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The unfolding story of Pennsylvania ginseng


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live on vinalhaven me


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outside house


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RIP Leslie Buck, Designer of Iconic Coffee Cup


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nice mismatched set of images of brick bbq pit from mixed construction lot


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Is the profession of architecture corrupt? According to the definition of “institutional corruption” currently in use at the Center for Ethics at Harvard University, yes.

The Center’s new director, renowned attorney Lawrence Lessig, has defined as “corrupt” organizations that have tragic structural flaws that undermine their own purposes for being. He has recently re-focused the Center’s resources on studying these ineffectual institutions and their corrosive effects.

Now, apply this descriptive framework to the architectural profession. Its purpose for being is to create architecture — that is, to make art out of the science of building. The purpose of this art, if there is one, is often debated but most agree it should engage, if not uplift, the individual mind and body as well as human culture as a whole. What kinds of structural features might be holding back the profession from consistently achieving these results?

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watched on hulu: polanski's 1966 cul-de-sac

*recommended
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welded shaker look

via adman
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La Trufa (truffle) is a small holiday house in the north of Spain, designed by Ensamble Studio

via justin
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devo obsesso mucho


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whiterockers

welded rebar furniture of cuba


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dull tool dim bulb


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giacometti bronze andirons / 1985 rockefeller copies / 1936 originals 385k


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cheep bronze copy statues suitable for the garden


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If Frost and Steketee have difficulty constructing a coherent new vision of compulsive hoarding, it is because they are too observant and too dedicated to the relief of suffering to make a complex phenomenon simple. They are collectors in their own right, stocking a cabinet of curiosities with intimate stories and evocative theories. To those who need to understand hoarders, perhaps in their own family, “Stuff” offers perspective. For general readers, it is likely to provide useful stimulus for examining how we form and justify our own attachments to objects.

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giant german barrels

large (5' x 5') barrel

kentucky barrels


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brass garden taps


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DEMAND THE IMPOSSIBLE! Posters From The 1968 Paris Uprising


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'The men are holding back, the men are cowards . . . we will take over'

On 5 October 1789 thousands of Parisian women tramped twelve miles to Versailles to bring the king back to the capital. This event radicalised the French Revolution.

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bastille model

pf palloy and reliques patriotiques

model of the bastille carved from an original stone building block

reflections on violence and the crowd in the images of the french revolution

re purposed stone block from the bastille

more stone remnants


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